My Daughter's Mum Part 1

by Natasha Badhwar
Regular price
Rs. 319.20
Regular price
Rs. 399.00
Sale price
Rs. 319.20
Condition

Condition Chart for Books

New: These are new books which have been purchased from publishers and authors.

Almost New: These are books which have been read previously or are excess stock from bookshops and publishers. These books will have:

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Good: These are the books which have have been sourced from book lovers and are in very good condition. They may have signs of ageing but will be in pretty good condition. These books will have:

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Vintage: These are the books which are collector's delight. They will have the year of publication in their name and are usually in good condition except for the usual sign of wear and tear due to ageing.

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My Daughters’ Mum—a first in a series of two essay collections—covers a range of essential subjects, from parenting and marriage, to faith and selfhood.

Knitting together a popular column in Mint Lounge, new writing and priceless handcrafted dialogues, the author describes her journey as the mother of three young daughters; as the wife of a man from a religious background unlike her own; and as an individual with dreams detached from the roles of wife and mother—here’s a wanderer, a feminist, a workplace goer.

Yet beyond the searingly personal, this is a memoir that tells us about an India that is fast transforming and where questions of identity and personal freedom are in dialogue with ideas of nationality. The candidness of the author’s voice, the gentle humour of fleeting narrative and the fragility of diary entries, photographs, collages and sketches will make My Daughters’ Mum resonate with every reader.
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